Gravity by Michael J White

Uranus

Uranus

Uranus's spin is retrograde, spinning in the opposite direction to most planets.

Its axis of rotation is tipped over by 98%, and the planet moves along the orbital path on its side.

Most stars are members of an industrial binary.

Solar planets contain more than 99% of the angular momentum of the Solar system.

Our star, the Sun, contains 99.87% of the mass of the Solar system.

Was our star, the Sun, part of a binary?

The fact that the planets have over 99% of the angular momentum of the Solar system would suggest that the Sun was part of a binary. A rotating disc is discovered at the equator rotating our Moon in it's orbit, and our star, the Sun, would have a rotating disc, rotating all of the planets in their orbit. Many other planets would have evidence of a rotating disc.

The only way the planets could have their angular momentum is if the thrust disc of our Sun took a small number of molten orbs out of its opposite number in the binary. However in the case of Uranus, what happened next?

The molten orb would be propelled way above the influence of the thrust disc of our star, the Sun, and come under the influence of the thrust disc of the opposite number in the binary. This is the probable reason why Uranus' spin is retrograde, spinning in the opposite direction to most planets.

What happens next?

You have seen your Mother tossing up a pancake.

The molten orb would drop, resulting in the eventual planet moving along its orbital path on its side within the thrust disc of our star, the Sun.

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